ACCRETE People

  • ACCRETE

    Climate change and ocean acidification are both a result of increasing anthropogenic CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere.  These two global-scale stressors will impact coral reefs in differing ways, but the interaction of the two over the 21st century are expected to threaten the persistence of coral reef ecosystems.  ACCRETE (Acidification, Climate, and Coral Reef Ecosystems TEam) researchers are actively researching how climate change and ocean acidification will, and, already are, affecting the construction (coral growth, calcification) and breakdown (bioerosion, dissolution) of coral reef ecosystems, as well as the associated ramifications this has for ecosystem function (e.g., biodiversity).  To this end, ACCRETE scientists utilize a unique interdisciplinary approach that incorporates aspects of biology, chemistry, and geology within an ecological framework.  Through field, laboratory, and modeling studies, this laboratory is improving our understanding of the rate and magnitude of climate change and acidification on coral reefs, as well as the ecological impacts of these changes.

    ACCRETE is a subunit of the Coral Health and Monitoring Program (CHAMP) and is located within the Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division (OCED) at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) in Miami, FL.  Please visit our ACCRETE People page for details about our team membership.

  • Sub-surface Automated Sampler (SAS)

    Sub-surface Automated Sampler (SAS)The sub-surface automated dual water sampler (SAS) was designed to help scientists study water chemistry on shallow reef habitats.

  • National Coral Reef Monitoring Program

    National Coral Reef Monitoring ProgramThe National Coral Reef Monitoring Program gauges the status and trends of coral reef health through long-term measurement of key variables.

  • Ocean Acidification Product Suite

    Ocean Acidification Product SuiteA high resolution monitoring product has been developed that maps current ocean acidification in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico.

  • East Coast Ocean Acidification Product Suite

    East Coast Ocean Acidification Product SuiteA new version of the Ocean Acidification Product Suite maps current ocean acidification on the East Coast of the United States.

  • Reef Framework Research

    Reef Framework ResearchClimate change has both thermal (warming) and chemical (ocean acidification, OA) ramifications for coral reef ecosystems.

  • Champ Portal

    CHAMP PortalThe CHAMP Portal is an online, map-based query tool for accessing oceanographic and meteorological data from the CHAMP database.

  • Changing Seas: Maug

    Changing Seas: MaugMaug's Caldera: A Natural Laboratory posted on YouTube by Changing Seas TV on June 24, 2016.

  • Google Hangout

    Google HangoutOcean Acidification: Breaking it Down posted on YouTube by the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation on April 30, 2015.

  • Waterways Documentary

    Waterways DocumentaryOcean Acidification & Tortugas Tide Gauge posted on YouTube by the Waterways TV Show on October 23, 2014.

  • Changing Seas: Galápagos

    Changing Seas: GalápagosGalápagos: Windows into the Future posted on YouTube by Changing Seas TV on June 25, 2014.

  • Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation

    Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans FoundationACCRETE has been participating on the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation's Global Reef Expedition since June 2012.

  • Derek P. Manzello, Ph.D.

    Derek P. Manzello, Ph.D.

    • Research Oceanographer
    • 305-361-4397
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    Derek Manzello is the Principal Investigator of ACCRETE, the coral reef climate change and ocean acidification monitoring of NOAA’s National Coral Reef Monitoring Program (NCRMP), which is co-funded by NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program and Ocean Acidification Program. Dr. Manzello manages the climate and acidification sentinel monitoring site at Cheeca Rocks within the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, one of three such sites within the wider Atlantic. He is also a co-PI on the National Science Foundation funded project "Are eastern Pacific Reefs becoming more resilient to ENSO?" that is a collaboration with the University of California-Los Angeles, the University of the Virgin Islands, the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) of Columbia University, and the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami (RSMAS). Manzello graduated Summa cum laude from the University of Miami in 2002 and went on to earn his Ph.D. from RSMAS in 2008 for his investigations into the thermal and chemical ramifications of climate change across two ocean basins: the Caribbean and eastern tropical Pacific. He is a research oceanographer with the Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division of NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in Miami.

  • Ian C. Enochs, Ph.D.

    Ian C. Enochs, Ph.D.

    • Research Ecologist
    • 305-361-4399
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    Ian Enochs is a principal investigator of ACCRETE. His research focuses on understanding the responses of corals and reef biota to global change. He is particularly interested in the impacts of warming and ocean acidification on the persistence of coral reef framework structures that provide essential habitat and support numerous ecosystem services. Enochs applies a multidisciplinary approach, conducting research in both the laboratory and the field, as well as developing new technologies to address pressing research questions. He is a co-PI of the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program, and leads several projects pertaining to the Coral Reef Conservation Program's restoration pillar and NOAA's Omics initiative. Enochs graduated cum laude from the University of Miami in 2006 and later earned his Ph.D. at RSMAS in 2010 for his research on the environmental determinants of coral reef cryptic metazoan biodiversity in Pacific Panama. Enochs is a research ecologist with the Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division of NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in Miami.

  • Anderson Mayfield, Ph.D.

    Anderson Mayfield, Ph.D.

    • Assistant Scientist
    • 305-361-4418
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    Anderson Mayfield joined the AOML ACCRETE team after an extended (11-year) sojourn in the Indo-Pacific, where he split his time between Southern Taiwan’s National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium and the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation’s (LOF) research vessel, the M.Y. Golden Shadow. At the former institute, Mayfield both carried out global climate change (GCC) simulation experiments in coral reef "mesocosms" and developed molecular biological tools for assessing reef coral health, while his role with LOF was to attempt to document the health of thousands of corals sampled from French Polynesia to the Chagos Archipelago as part the “Global Reef Expedition” (the largest coral reef survey ever undertaken). Mayfield is now attempting to use the molecular biotechnological protocols and coral “stress test” assays he developed in Asia with corals from 1) ACCRETE’s GCC manipulation experiments and 2) the South Florida reef tract (particularly reefs that have been found previously by ACCRETE team members to span a gradient of resilience, from highly heat tolerant to extremely sensitive to environmental perturbations). Mayfield's ultimate goal is to create means of predicting coral health on a pre-death timescale such that coral reef “triage” could be enacted in situ.

  • Ewelina Rubin, Ph.D.

    Ewelina Rubin, Ph.D.

    • Senior Research Associate
    • 305-361-4408
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    Ewelina Rubin joined the ACCRETE research team in Nov 2019. She is using RNA-seq methodology to understand transcriptomic responses of corals surviving in marginal reef environments and to provide insight into molecular mechanisms that enable their resilience. Currently, she is contributing to the Urban Coral project, an exciting study of the resilient population of brain coral (Pseudiploria stigosa) that lives in the poor-quality waters near the Port of Miami. She received her MS degree from Nova Southeastern University, FL where she studied stony coral recruitment to ship grounding sites. In addition, she received her PhD from Stony Brook University where she studied molecular mechanisms of pathogenic virulence and host-resistance to disease. She gained additional molecular biology and next generation high throughput sequencing as well as bioinformatics experience during her postdoctoral studies at University of Connecticut and University of Rhode Island. She recently returned to Florida and is hoping to use her research experience to study stony corals and to make her personal contribution to protection efforts for these beautiful animals.

  • Michael S. Studivan, Ph.D.

    Michael S. Studivan, Ph.D.

    • Assistant Scientist
    • 305-361-4361
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    Michael Studivan is a principal investigator at CIMAS and UM lead of the Experimental Reef Laboratory. His research involves the use of advanced molecular techniques to better understand coral physiology and adaptation, as well as genetic connectivity of coral ecosystems in marginal environments. He aims to identify molecular mechanisms at the individual level that may affect population-wide ecosystem processes in variable environments, particularly in light of recent coral disease outbreaks on the Florida Reef Tract and wider Caribbean. He completed his graduate degrees and postdoctoral fellowship at Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute. Studivan's dissertation research addressed mesophotic coral ecosystem connectivity and mesophotic coral morphology/physiology using genotyping, skeletal morphometrics, and gene expression profiling with Montastraea cavernosa from the Gulf of Mexico (Flower Garden Banks and Pulley Ridge) and the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef (Carrie Bow Cay, Belize). For his postdoctoral research, he characterized the response of corals to stony coral tissue loss disease and intervention strategies using RNA-Seq gene expression profiling and 3D modeling.

  • Ruben van Hooidonk, Ph.D.

    Ruben van Hooidonk, Ph.D.

    • Assistant Scientist
    • 305-361-4524
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    Ruben van Hooidonk designed and maintains the redesigned Ocean Acidification Product Suite (OAPS). Dr. van Hooidonk is interested in utilizing global climate models to forecast future risk and uncertainty for coral reefs with climate change and ocean acidification. He currently is a principal investigator on two projects through NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program to improve bleaching prediction and expand the OAPS to the Pacific. Van Hooidonk earned his Ph.D. from Purdue University in 2009 and previously attended Utrecht University in the Netherlands where he earned his B.Sc and M.Sc.

  • Nicole Besemer, M.P.S.

    Nicole Besemer, M.P.S.

    • Senior Research Associate
    • 305-361-4374
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    Nicole Besemer is a marine biologist whose work has focused primarily on south Florida and Caribbean ecosystem management and conservation. She received her M.P.S. degree from the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science in 2017 and her previous research efforts include invasive species management, endangered sea turtle conservation and monitoring impacts of Everglades restoration efforts on Biscayne Bay. Besemer has joined ACCRETE as the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program's Caribbean Climate Operations Coordinator. Her work focuses on implementation of the Climate Monitoring Component of NCRMP including but not limited to planning and operation of associated fieldwork as well as data analysis and submission related to how ocean acidification and global warming are affecting coral reef communities in the Atlantic.

  • Nate Formel, M.S.

    Nate Formel, M.S.

    • Senior Research Associate
    • 305-361-4514
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    Nate Formel is a marine biologist whose work has focused mainly on conservation and restoration of coral reef ecosystems in Florida, Hawaii, and the Caribbean. He holds an M.S. from the University of Miami and is currently a Research Associate at AOML's Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division and the University of Miami's Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS). Formel's work at CIMAS and AOML focuses on developing novel, low-cost, and open-source sampling equipment to expand the suite of tools used to study coral reef ecosystems to better understand the changes happening in our oceans and how these changes are affecting the reefs.

  • Michael Jankulak, M.S.

    Michael Jankulak, M.S.

    • Senior Systems Administrator
    • 305-361-4543
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    Mike Jankulak provides technical support for ACCRETE, as well as the maintenance and deployment of field instrumentation that report data in near-real-time via satellite relay. Jankulak is also the data manager for all time-series of environmental data of the larger CHAMP program. He received his M.S. from the University of Miami in 2012 for his work on association rule mining for the prediction of rapid intensity changes of tropical cyclones.

  • Isabelle Basden

    Isabelle Basden

    • ACCRETE Intern
    • 305-361-xxxx
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    Isabelle Basden received her B.S. in Biological Sciences with honors in Marine Science from Florida State University in Fall 2018. She is currently an ACCRETE Lab intern and a research assistant with the Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Studies at University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. She assists in various laboratory and field research activities and is broadly interested in studying the ecological impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs

  • Albert Boyd

    Albert Boyd

    • Research Associate
    • 305-361-4458
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    Albert Boyd was recruited by the University of Miami as a research assistant while working on his B.S. with a major in biology and a minor in marine science and chemistry, for outstanding service in the multi-organizational state sponsored Redfish Stock Assessment program. After completing his B.S. degree, he continued working for more than three decades at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science as a research associate. Boyd specializes in macro algae culture, photothermic pelagic fish breeding, and advance water quality analysis. Other specialties include advance light and water data logging, design of open and closed experimental research fish and coral systems. Boyd has assumed the role of Coral Carbonate Chemist with the ACCRETE Team.

  • Allyson DeMerlis

    Allyson DeMerlis

    • Ph.D. Student
    • 305-361-xxxx
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    Allyson DeMerlis obtained her B.S. degree from McGill University studying molecular biology in Spring 2017. She is currently a first-year Ph.D. student at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and is interested in studying the molecular basis for coral resilience against bleaching and disease.

  • Graham Kolodziej

    Graham Kolodziej

    • Research Associate
    • 305-361-4331
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    Graham Kolodziej works with Drs. Derek Manzello and Ian Enochs in support of their efforts to study the impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Kolodziej serves as the permit coordinator for ACCRETE and is a technician specializing in the use of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to study the fine-scale processes of coral calcification and bioerosion. Kolodziej received his B.S. degree from the Division of Marine Biology and Fisheries of the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School in 2008 and is currently a research associate with the Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School.