ACCRETE People

  • Derek P. Manzello, Ph.D.

    • Research Oceanographer
    • 305-361-4397
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    Derek Manzello is the Principal Investigator of ACCRETE, the coral reef climate change and ocean acidification monitoring of NOAA’s National Coral Reef Monitoring Program (NCRMP), which is co-funded by NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program and Ocean Acidification Program. Dr. Manzello manages the climate and acidification sentinel monitoring site at Cheeca Rocks within the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, one of three such sites within the wider Atlantic. He is also a co-PI on the National Science Foundation funded project "Are eastern Pacific Reefs becoming more resilient to ENSO?" that is a collaboration with the University of California-Los Angeles, the University of the Virgin Islands, the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) of Columbia University, and the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami (RSMAS). Manzello graduated Summa cum laude from the University of Miami in 2002 and went on to earn his Ph.D. from RSMAS in 2008 for his investigations into the thermal and chemical ramifications of climate change across two ocean basins: the Caribbean and eastern tropical Pacific. He is a research oceanographer with the Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division of NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in Miami.

  • Ian C. Enochs, Ph.D.

    • Research Ecologist
    • 305-361-4399
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    Ian Enochs is the co-principal investigator of ACCRETE and NCRMP. Dr. Enochs is the principal investigator of three projects: 1) Maug: a rare ocean acidification hotspot in US waters, 2) Incorporating Risk from Ocean Acidification into Acropora nurseries, and 3) Establishing numeric nutrient criteria for Southeast Florida Reefs. Enochs graduated cum laude from the University of Miami in 2006 and later earned his Ph.D. at RSMAS in 2010 for his research on the environmental determinants of coral reef cryptic metazoan biodiversity in Pacific Panama. Enochs is an assistant scientist with the Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School.

  • Catalina Aguilar, Ph.D.

    • Post Doctoral Associate
    • 305-361-4408
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    Catalina Aguilar is a post-doctoral research associate with AOML’s Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division and the University of Miami’s Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS). Dr. Aguilar is working with Drs. Derek Manzello and Ian Enochs on a newly-initiated coral genomics project, using AOML’s new Future Reef Laboratory for genetic experiments to test for coral resilience to temperature and ocean acidification stress. Aguilar received her Ph.D. in 2016 from the James Cook University and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) Quantitative Marine Science program, where she investigated the responses of corals to environmental stress using transcriptomics.

  • Anderson Mayfield, Ph.D.

    • Assistant Scientist
    • 305-361-4418
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    Anderson Mayfield joined the AOML ACCRETE team after an extended (11-year) sojourn in the Indo-Pacific, where he split his time between Southern Taiwan’s National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium and the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation’s (LOF) research vessel, the M.Y. Golden Shadow. At the former institute, Mayfield both carried out global climate change (GCC) simulation experiments in coral reef "mesocosms" and developed molecular biological tools for assessing reef coral health, while his role with LOF was to attempt to document the health of thousands of corals sampled from French Polynesia to the Chagos Archipelago as part the “Global Reef Expedition” (the largest coral reef survey ever undertaken). Mayfield is now attempting to use the molecular biotechnological protocols and coral “stress test” assays he developed in Asia with corals from 1) ACCRETE’s GCC manipulation experiments and 2) the South Florida reef tract (particularly reefs that have been found previously by ACCRETE team members to span a gradient of resilience, from highly heat tolerant to extremely sensitive to environmental perturbations). Mayfield's ultimate goal is to create means of predicting coral health on a pre-death timescale such that coral reef “triage” could be enacted in situ.

  • Ruben van Hooidonk, Ph.D.

    • Assistant Scientist
    • 305-361-4524
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    Ruben van Hooidonk designed and maintains the redesigned Ocean Acidification Product Suite (OAPS). Dr. van Hooidonk is interested in utilizing global climate models to forecast future risk and uncertainty for coral reefs with climate change and ocean acidification. He currently is a principal investigator on two projects through NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program to improve bleaching prediction and expand the OAPS to the Pacific. Van Hooidonk earned his Ph.D. from Purdue University in 2009 and previously attended Utrecht University in the Netherlands where he earned his B.Sc and M.Sc.

  • Nate Formel

    • Research Associate
    • 305-361-4514
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    Nate Formel is a marine biologist whose work has focused mainly on conservation and restoration of coral reef ecosystems in Florida, Hawaii, and the Caribbean. He holds an M.S. from the University of Miami and is currently a Research Associate at AOML's Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division and the University of Miami's Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS). Formel's work at CIMAS and AOML focuses on developing novel, low-cost, and open-source sampling equipment to expand the suite of tools used to study coral reef ecosystems to better understand the changes happening in our oceans and how these changes are affecting the reefs.

  • Michael Jankulak, M.S.

    • Senior Systems Administrator
    • 305-361-4543
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    Mike Jankulak provides technical support for ACCRETE, as well as the maintenance and deployment of field instrumentation that report data in near-real-time via satellite relay. Jankulak is also the data manager for all time-series of environmental data of the larger CHAMP program. He received his M.S. from the University of Miami in 2012 for his work on association rule mining for the prediction of rapid intensity changes of tropical cyclones.

  • Graham Kolodziej

    • Research Associate
    • 305-361-4331
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    Graham Kolodziej works with Drs. Derek Manzello and Ian Enochs in support of their efforts to study the impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Kolodziej serves as the permit coordinator for ACCRETE and is a technician specializing in the use of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to study the fine-scale processes of coral calcification and bioerosion. Kolodziej received his B.S. degree from the Division of Marine Biology and Fisheries of the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School in 2008 and is currently a research associate with the Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School.

  • John Morris

    • Ph.D. Student
    • 305-361-4393
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    John Morris received a B.A. with honors in marine science from the University of Miami in the spring of 2017. He is currently a second-year Ph.D. student at Rosentiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. He is focused on investigating the effects of ocean acidification on coral reef persistence and bioeroding sponges.