CHAMP People

  • James C. Hendee, Ph.D.

    • Director, Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division
    • 305-361-4396
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    Jim Hendee is the Director of the Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division of the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), an oceanographer with NOAA, and the originator (in 1993) of the Coral Health and Monitoring Program, which includes the Coral-List list-server, the Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS), and the Integrated Coral Observing Network. CHAMP has been funded over the years by the Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP), the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) office, the NOAA Ocean and Atmospheric Research (OAR) line office, and AOML in Miami, Florida. CHAMP now includes other research projects originated and funded by other personnel such as those found on this web site. Dr. Hendee oversees all the CHAMP operations. Hendee received his B.S. in marine biology from Florida State University, his M.S. in marine biology from the University of Alaska at Fairbanks, and his Ph.D. in Information Systems from Nova Southeastern University.

  • Derek P. Manzello, Ph.D.

    • Research Oceanographer
    • 305-361-4397
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    Derek Manzello is the Principal Investigator of ACCRETE, the coral reef climate change and ocean acidification monitoring of NOAA’s National Coral Reef Monitoring Program (NCRMP), which is co-funded by NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program and Ocean Acidification Program, as well as the Atlantic Ocean Acidification Test-Bed (AOAT). Dr. Manzello manages the climate and acidification sentinel monitoring site at Cheeca Rocks within the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, one of three such sites within the wider Atlantic. He is also a co-PI on the National Science Foundation funded project "Are eastern Pacific Reefs becoming more resilient to ENSO?" that is a collaboration with the University of California-Los Angeles, the University of the Virgin Islands, the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) of Columbia University, and the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami (RSMAS). Manzello graduated Summa cum laude from the University of Miami in 2002 and went on to earn his Ph.D. from RSMAS in 2008 for his investigations into the thermal and chemical ramifications of climate change across two ocean basins: the Caribbean and eastern tropical Pacific. He is a research oceanographer with the Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division of NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in Miami.

  • Ian C. Enochs, Ph.D.

    • Research Ecologist
    • 305-361-4399
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    Ian Enochs is the co-principal investigator of ACCRETE, NCRMP, and AOAT. Dr. Enochs is the principal investigator of three projects: 1) Maug: a rare ocean acidification hotspot in US waters, 2) Incorporating Risk from Ocean Acidification into Acropora nurseries, and 3) Establishing numeric nutrient criteria for Southeast Florida Reefs. Enochs graduated cum laude from the University of Miami in 2006 and later earned his Ph.D. at RSMAS in 2010 for his research on the environmental determinants of coral reef cryptic metazoan biodiversity in Pacific Panama. Enochs is an assistant scientist with the Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School.

  • Catalina Aguilar, Ph.D.

    • Post Doctoral Associate
    • 305-361-4408
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    Catalina Aguilar is a post-doctoral research associate with AOML’s Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division and the University of Miami’s Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS). Dr. Aguilar is working with Drs. Derek Manzello and Ian Enochs on a newly-initiated coral genomics project, using AOML’s new Future Reef Laboratory for genetic experiments to test for coral resilience to temperature and ocean acidification stress. Aguilar received her Ph.D. in 2016 from the James Cook University and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) Quantitative Marine Science program, where she investigated the responses of corals to environmental stress using transcriptomics.

  • Natchanon Amornthammarong, Ph.D.

    • Assistant Scientist
    • 305-361-4537
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    Natchanon Amornthammarong ("Mana") is an engineer/scientist who completed his Ph.D. at Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand in 2006. Dr. Amornthammarong is the co-principal investigator of two projects: 1) Development of an autonomous ammonium fluorescence sensor (AAFS) with a view toward in-situ application, and 2) Development of a submersible ammonium fluorescence analyzer with sustainable power for in-situ and underwater application with a view towards application on Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs). Amornthammarong was a field scientist of the CLIVAR Repeat Hydrography Program, the Gulf of Mexico and East Coast Carbon Cruise (GOMECC) Program, and the Florida Area Coastal Environment (FACE) Program. Amornthammarong's web site is www.astemlab.com.

  • Lewis J. Gramer, Ph.D.

    • Assistant Scientist
    • 305-361-4554
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    Lew Gramer is a physical oceanographer who completed his Ph.D. at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School in 2013, while researching environmental data streams and knowledge-based ecological forecasts for CHAMP. He is currently a research associate with CHAMP at AOML-OCED in Miami through the University of Miami's Cooperative Institute, and a postdoctoral researcher at Keys Marine Lab through the Florida Institute of Oceanography. His research focuses on the air-sea and dynamical ocean processes that dominate the physical environment of coral reefs and other shallow marine ecosystems, including horizontal convection, upwelling, mixing, and light attenuation. His current projects include tracking turbidity plumes over reefs in Florida and the Pacific from space, characterizing priority sites for reef resilience and restoration in the Caribbean based on oceanography, and quantifying the impact of upwelling on the physical and chemical environment of corals in southeast Florida. These collaborative, multidisciplinary projects incorporate in situ observations of the ocean and atmosphere, computer modeling, and remote sensing using a variety of platforms. Lew also continues to develop new data sources, analyses, and ecological forecasts for the expanding CREWS network in the Caribbean, and for "virtual stations" (reef sites monitored by remote sensing and reanalysis) around the world.

  • Stephanie Rosales, Ph.D.

    • Senior Research Associate
    • 305-361-4511
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    Stephanie Rosales is a senior research associate at the University of Miami's (UM) Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS) and is stationed at NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML). Dr. Rosales is interested in characterizing and understanding microorganisms that may be detrimental or beneficial to marine organisms by utilizing next-generation sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. Rosales is currently a Co-PI with Xaymara Serrano on a Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) grant to catalog the microbial community and viral consortia present in corals that were found to be disease resistant or susceptible. This project is a collaboration with scientists at NOAA and UM's RSMAS campus. Rosales received her B.S. in marine biology at Florida International University and was an NSF GRFP fellow at Oregon State University where she received her Ph.D. in microbiology.

  • Ruben van Hooidonk, Ph.D.

    • Assistant Scientist
    • 305-361-4524
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    Ruben van Hooidonk designed and maintains the redesigned Ocean Acidification Product Suite (OAPS) of the Atlantic Ocean Acidification Test-Bed. Dr. van Hooidonk is interested in utilizing global climate models to forecast future risk and uncertainty for coral reefs with climate change and ocean acidification. He currently is a principal investigator on two projects through NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program to improve bleaching prediction and expand the OAPS to the Pacific. Van Hooidonk earned his Ph.D. from Purdue University in 2009 and previously attended Utrecht University in the Netherlands where he earned his B.Sc and M.Sc.

  • Liz Dutra, M.S.

    • Research Associate
    • 305-361-4374
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    Liz Dutra is a Marine Biologist whose research focuses on coral reefs in South Florida and the Cayman Islands, studying the effects of Ocean Acidification on calcifying macroalgal species. She holds an M.S. degree from the Department of Biological Sciences at Florida Atlantic University and is currently a research associate with the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. Dutra works with Drs. Derek Manzello and Ian Enochs on field missions, as well as environmental and biological data analysis, quality control, and management pertaining to NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program's National Coral Reef Monitoring Program (NCRMP).

  • Nate Formel

    • Research Associate
    • 305-361-4514
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    Nate Formel is a marine biologist whose work has focused mainly on conservation and restoration of coral reef ecosystems in Florida, Hawaii, and the Caribbean. He holds an M.S. from the University of Miami and is currently a Research Associate at AOML's Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division and the University of Miami's Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS). Formel's work at CIMAS and AOML focuses on developing novel, low-cost, and open-source sampling equipment to expand the suite of tools used to study coral reef ecosystems to better understand the changes happening in our oceans and how these changes are affecting the reefs.

  • Michael Jankulak, M.S.

    • Senior Systems Administrator
    • 305-361-4543
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    Mike Jankulak provides technical support for ACCRETE, as well as the maintenance and deployment of field instrumentation that report data in near-real-time via satellite relay. Jankulak is also the data manager for all time-series of environmental data of the larger CHAMP program. He received his M.S. from the University of Miami in 2012 for his work on association rule mining for the prediction of rapid intensity changes of tropical cyclones.

  • Leah Chomiak

    • Research Associate
    • 305-361-4416
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    Leah Chomiak is the lead carbonate chemist of the ACCRETE program, characterizing dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, and pH of seawater to study the effects of ocean acidification on NCRMP field projects and experiments within NOAA AOML's Experimental Reef Lab. She received a B.S. in Marine Science, Chemistry, and Meteorology with honors from the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science in 2017, and is currently a Research Associate with the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School.

  • Amanda Kirkland

    • ACCRETE Intern
    • 305-361-xxxx
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    Amanda Kirkland is a lab assistant who supports ocean acidification projects in the CIMAS Experimental Reef Lab and at NOAA/AOML under the supervision of Dr. Ian Enochs. She received her B.A. in Biological Conservation and a minor in Environmental Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2016 and is currently an ACCRETE intern.

  • Graham Kolodziej

    • Research Associate
    • 305-361-4331
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    Graham Kolodziej works with Drs. Derek Manzello and Ian Enochs in support of their efforts to study the impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Kolodziej serves as the permit coordinator for ACCRETE and is a technician specializing in the use of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to study the fine-scale processes of coral calcification and bioerosion. Kolodziej received his B.S. degree from the Division of Marine Biology and Fisheries of the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School in 2008 and is currently a research associate with the Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School.

  • John Morris

    • Ph.D. Student
    • 305-361-4393
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    John Morris received a B.A. with honors in marine science from the University of Miami in the spring of 2017. He is currently a second-year Ph.D. student at Rosentiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. He is focused on investigating the effects of ocean acidification on coral reef persistence and bioeroding sponges.

  • Emy Rodriguez

    • Administrative Assistant
    • 305-361-4380
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    Emy Rodriguez is the Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division's Administrative Assistant. For over twenty years, she has been providing administrative and programmatic support to the division. She manages and oversees travel for NOAA federal employees. She coordinates, processes and advises on federal travel policies, administrative procedures, purchasing, acquisitions, and security clearances. Rodriguez has been an essential member of the CHAMP team since its inception.

  • Lauren Shea

    • ACCRETE Intern
    • 305-361-xxxx
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    Lauren Shea is a research assistant who supports ocean acidification projects in the CIMAS Experimental Reef Lab and at NOAA/AOML under the supervision of Dr. Ian Enochs. She received a B.S. degree in Marine Biology from the University of South Florida in 2017 and is currently an ACCRETE intern.

  • Alyssa Thompson

    • Lieutenant (Junior Grade), NOAA Corps
    • 305-361-4305
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    Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Alyssa Thompson is the Research Operations Manager for the Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division. She supports the small boat operations as Vessel Operations Coordinator (VOC) and is responsible for managing the four AOML small boats. She also assists with NOAA diving operations and field sampling efforts for ecosystem research conducted in South Florida's coastal waters. Thompson holds a B.S. degree in animal science from Virginia Tech, with specialty courses in ichthyology, genetics, and fish ecology.