ACCRETE People

  • ACCRETE

    Climate change and ocean acidification are both a result of increasing anthropogenic CO2 in the Earth’s atmosphere.  These two global-scale stressors will impact coral reefs in differing ways, but the interaction of the two over the 21st century are expected to threaten the persistence of coral reef ecosystems.  ACCRETE (Acidification, Climate, and Coral Reef Ecosystems TEam) researchers are actively researching how climate change and ocean acidification will, and, already are, affecting the construction (coral growth, calcification) and breakdown (bioerosion, dissolution) of coral reef ecosystems, as well as the associated ramifications this has for ecosystem function (e.g., biodiversity).  To this end, ACCRETE scientists utilize a unique interdisciplinary approach that incorporates aspects of biology, chemistry, and geology within an ecological framework.  Through field, laboratory, and modeling studies, this laboratory is improving our understanding of the rate and magnitude of climate change and acidification on coral reefs, as well as the ecological impacts of these changes.

    ACCRETE is a subunit of the Coral Health and Monitoring Program (CHAMP) and is located within the Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division (OCED) at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) in Miami, FL.  Please visit our ACCRETE People page for details about our team membership.

  • National Coral Reef Monitoring Program

    National Coral Reef Monitoring ProgramThe National Coral Reef Monitoring Program gauges the status and trends of coral reef health through long-term measurement of key variables.

  • Ocean Acidification Product Suite

    Ocean Acidification Product SuiteA high resolution monitoring product has been developed that maps current ocean acidification in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico.

  • Atlantic OA Test-bed

    Altantic Ocean Acidification Test-bedThe Atlantic Ocean Acidification Test-bed assesses through monitoring and research the impacts of ocean acidification on Atlantic coral reef ecosystems.

  • Reef Framework Research

    Reef Framework ResearchClimate change has both thermal (warming) and chemical (ocean acidification, OA) ramifications for coral reef ecosystems.

  • Champ Portal

    CHAMP PortalThe CHAMP Portal is an online, map-based query tool for accessing oceanographic and meteorological data from the CHAMP database.

  • Changing Seas: Maug

    Changing Seas: MaugMaug's Caldera: A Natural Laboratory posted on YouTube by Changing Seas TV on June 24, 2016.

  • Google Hangout

    Google HangoutOcean Acidification: Breaking it Down posted on YouTube by the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation on April 30, 2015.

  • Waterways Documentary

    Waterways DocumentaryOcean Acidification & Tortugas Tide Gauge posted on YouTube by the Waterways TV Show on October 23, 2014.

  • Changing Seas: Galápagos

    Changing Seas: GalápagosGalápagos: Windows into the Future posted on YouTube by Changing Seas TV on June 25, 2014.

  • Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation

    Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans FoundationACCRETE has been participating on the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation's Global Reef Expedition since June 2012.

  • Derek P. Manzello, Ph.D.

    Derek P. Manzello, Ph.D.

    • Research Oceanographer
    • 305-361-4397
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    Derek Manzello is the Principal Investigator of ACCRETE, the coral reef climate change and ocean acidification monitoring of NOAA’s National Coral Reef Monitoring Program (NCRMP), which is co-funded by NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program and Ocean Acidification Program, as well as the Atlantic Ocean Acidification Test-Bed (AOAT). Dr. Manzello manages the climate and acidification sentinel monitoring site at Cheeca Rocks within the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, one of three such sites within the wider Atlantic. He is also a co-PI on the National Science Foundation funded project "Are eastern Pacific Reefs becoming more resilient to ENSO?" that is a collaboration with the University of California-Los Angeles, the University of the Virgin Islands, the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) of Columbia University, and the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami (RSMAS). Manzello graduated Summa cum laude from the University of Miami in 2002 and went on to earn his Ph.D. from RSMAS in 2008 for his investigations into the thermal and chemical ramifications of climate change across two ocean basins: the Caribbean and eastern tropical Pacific. He is a research oceanographer with the Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division of NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in Miami.

  • Catalina Aguilar, Ph.D.

    Catalina Aguilar, Ph.D.

    • Post Doctoral Associate
    • 305-361-4408
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    Catalina Aguilar is a post-doctoral research associate with AOML’s Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division and the University of Miami’s Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS). Dr. Aguilar is working with Drs. Derek Manzello and Ian Enochs on a newly-initiated coral genomics project, using AOML’s new Future Reef Laboratory for genetic experiments to test for coral resilience to temperature and ocean acidification stress. Aguilar received her Ph.D. in 2016 from the James Cook University and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) Quantitative Marine Science program, where she investigated the responses of corals to environmental stress using transcriptomics.

  • Ian C. Enochs, Ph.D.

    Ian C. Enochs, Ph.D.

    • Associate Scientist
    • 305-361-4399
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    Ian Enochs is the co-principal investigator of ACCRETE, NCRMP, and AOAT. Dr. Enochs is the principal investigator of three projects: 1) Maug: a rare ocean acidification hotspot in US waters, 2) Incorporating Risk from Ocean Acidification into Acropora nurseries, and 3) Establishing numeric nutrient criteria for Southeast Florida Reefs. Enochs graduated cum laude from the University of Miami in 2006 and later earned his Ph.D. at RSMAS in 2010 for his research on the environmental determinants of coral reef cryptic metazoan biodiversity in Pacific Panama. Enochs is an assistant scientist with the Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School.

  • Paul Jones, Ph.D.

    Paul Jones, Ph.D.

    • Postdoctoral Associate
    • 305-361-4508
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    Paul Jones is a postdoctoral associate working with Dr. Ian Enochs on his project to help establish numeric nutrient criteria for Southeast Florida Reefs. Dr. Jones received his Ph.D. from the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami in 2013, where he studied symbiont shuffling in thermally-stressed, bleached corals.

  • Ruben van Hooidonk, Ph.D.

    Ruben van Hooidonk, Ph.D.

    • Assistant Scientist
    • 305-361-4524
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    Ruben van Hooidonk designed and maintains the redesigned Ocean Acidification Product Suite (OAPS) of the Atlantic Ocean Acidification Test-Bed. Dr. van Hooidonk is interested in utilizing global climate models to forecast future risk and uncertainty for coral reefs with climate change and ocean acidification. He currently is a principal investigator on two projects through NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program to improve bleaching prediction and expand the OAPS to the Pacific. Van Hooidonk earned his Ph.D. from Purdue University in 2009 and previously attended Utrecht University in the Netherlands where he earned his B.Sc and M.Sc.

  • Michael Jankulak, M.S.

    Michael Jankulak, M.S.

    • Systems Administrator
    • 305-361-4543
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    Mike Jankulak provides technical support for ACCRETE, as well as the maintenance and deployment of field instrumentation that report data in near-real-time via satellite relay. Jankulak is also the data manager for all time-series of environmental data of the larger CHAMP program. He received his M.S. from the University of Miami in 2012 for his work on association rule mining for the prediction of rapid intensity changes of tropical cyclones.

  • Lauren Valentino, M.S.

    Lauren Valentino, M.S.

    • Senior Research Associate
    • 305-361-4511
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    Lauren Valentino works primarily on the project "Coral Growth and Reef Framework Persistence of the Florida Reef Tract: Miami-Dade to Broward" that was funded by NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program. Valentino works with Dr. Derek Manzello to measure coral growth and bioerosion rates, as well as carbonate chemistry dynamics of reefs in Southeast Florida, off of Miami-Dade and Broward counties. This project is a continuation of work carried out by Manzello in the Florida Keys from 2009-2013. Valentino also serves as data manager and ensures quality control of numerous data sets. She received her M.S. from Cal State University in Northridge California in 2014 for her research exploring the impact of ocean acidification on the boring bivalve Lithophaga in Moorea, French Polynesia.  Valentino previously received her B.S. from the University of Rhode Island.

  • Graham Kolodziej

    Graham Kolodziej

    • Research Associate
    • 305-361-4331
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    Graham Kolodziej works with Drs. Derek Manzello and Ian Enochs in support of their efforts to study the impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Kolodziej serves as the permit coordinator for ACCRETE and is a technician specializing in the use of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to study the fine-scale processes of coral calcification and bioerosion. Kolodziej received his B.S. degree from the Division of Marine Biology and Fisheries of the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School in 2008 and is currently a research associate with the Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School.